The Oscillation’s third album “From Tomorrow” is an attempt to find some kind of new mental and spiritual zones, away from the psychological effects of the modern urban landscape, and the curious emptiness of the digital social world that we are forced to inhabit.
The introversion of these bleak and unsettling conditions are reflected back as music with all the ambiguous emotions of hope, despair, aggression, indolence and narcoleptic bliss.
These are the preconditions for the sonic world presented on “From Tomorrow”.  This is music that on one side has been chewed by the teeth of insanity and spat out into a strange landscape, whilst the other is basking in the warmth of a mysterious inner sun.  This state of affairs if mirrored by the cover artwork which was created by film maker Julian Hand.
This dystopian psychobabble aside, it is perhaps fitting to reference the musical otherness of Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd, the absurdist punk attitude of The Stranglers (‘The Raven’ and ‘Men In Black’ eras), the garage dementia of Helios Creed with the odd snarl of ‘Sabbath Bloody Sabbath’.

Let it not be said that The Oscillation do little to live up to their name. The first thing that hits the ears is a wavering and undulating chord that snakes its way out of the speakers with all the hypnotic grace of smoke curling and snaking away from a smouldering hookah pipe. It’s a nice touch and one of many that sets The Oscillation apart from many of the bands that are now breaking through on the back of psychedelic wave that’s threatening to turn into a mind-melting tsunami.

As evidenced by opener tracks ‘Corrider (Part 1)’ and ‘Corrider (Part 2)’, The Oscillation is a band that seduces with a false sense of security. Dampened chords and strict metronomic rhythms soon give way to cosmic explorations but what gives The Oscillation a true sense of identity is the way they manage to subvert and twist psychedelia into something that’s wholly their own. While most explorers of time and space anchor their excursions to standard song structures before blasting off into unexplored territories, The Oscillation are already out there. Not for them the launch pad of conventionality, The Oscillation grab the listener by the lapels and plunge them straight into a miasma of sonic misbehaviour.

What also counts in The Oscillation’s favour is how much to the fore the rhythm section of bassist Tom Relleen and drummer Valentina Magaletti is. Their roles aren’t confined to showing off to the guitar and pedal talents of Demian Castellanos by remaining in the background. Instead, their solid work is fused with the unholy and demented noises coaxed by the guitarist. The Middle Eastern inflections of ‘Descent’ wouldn’t be anywhere near as strong would it not be for treated drums that pan across the sound spectrum and a bass that positively throbs, probably no more so than on ‘No Place To Go’.

Castellanos’ vocals are smeared in reverb throughout and the effect isn’t unlike being privvy some kind of ritualistic ceremony. Indeed, closing epic ‘Out Of Touch’ would probably make the perfect musical accompaniment for your next S&M session alongside burning candles, a variety of painful looking toys and boots of shiny, shiny leather.

Do you ever feel like music isn’t loud enough these days? That it’s not raw enough, bold enough, that it’s too detached? Or perhaps you feel the opposite; that modern music shouts without saying anything, postures without breaking boundaries, and fails to take account of what people are really feeling out there? Whatever your persuasion, if you’re a musical malcontent, The Oscillation’s third album is for you.

From Tomorrow is drenched in a wall of distortion and growling guitars that makes the record feel volatile and dangerous; yet somehow it is full of shapeless, weightless moments that make it come across as startlingly disconnected with any concrete reality. The energy and dynamism of punk protest and grunge attitude is seamlessly blended with an ethereal, intoxicated blurring of sometimes chaotic soundscapes.

The album’s final track, ‘Out of Touch’, not only continues the band’s penchant for naming their tracks after pre-existing popular classics (their previous album Veils featured a track entitled ‘Sandstorm’), but it also embodies this deliberate evasion of reality. The mournfulness which pervades the track, along with the gentle, wave-like rolls of cymbals, make you feel as if you have just been washed up on a deserted beach. It’s a desolate and delicate waltz on the sand.

But From Tomorrow is far from dominated by this fleeting fragility. The eerie melange of aggression and suspense on ‘Corridors’ (Part One and Part Two) melds tension and mystery with a world of distorted guitar, diving bass and a heavy dose of testosterone.  ‘No Place to Go’ builds upon this sonic masculinity, with gritty solos and enough attitude to make you feel as if you can hear the growl of exhausts and the screech of tyres on tarmac. It feels bold, assertive and unequivocal.

The striking thing about From Tomorrow is the fineness that rescues what could otherwise be a crass or dull record full of droning guitar and the occasional twiddle of synth. The Oscillation are often labeled as psychedelic, but that term comes with a lot of baggage that, in this case, is largely undeserved. The extravagance and chaos that is so often implied by the term is completely absent from this album.

Although The Oscillation might create surreal adventures into sometimes disturbed regions of the psyche (their own, or their listener’s– you decide), the production is slick and refined. There is no excess. There is simply economy. The intense and often overwhelming experiences it creates are not the product of chaos of disorder – it is clear that every sound here is carefully curated. Every clink, every growl, every beep seems perfectly placed to create maximum impact.

In essence, From Tomorrow does not make for easy listening. But that is far from the point. The marriage of noise and delicacy is one that manages to both make a musical statement and be truly emotional, thanks to the obvious craftsmanship of the band. At its most intense, From Tomorrow is an example chaos born of order and madness created by precision. And that is a thing of beauty.

I have been looking forward to this, the third album by The Oscillation and can I start by simply saying it has been worth the wait. They start where they left off, awakening with a chant like quality, from the opening track ‘Corridor (Part 1)’ we start, with what is a full on psychedelic master class of shimmering guitars, throbbing bass lines and pounding drums. The vocals seem to summon more than sing. It is a hedonistic oral stroke across the back of my head, as it merges further it with the next track ‘Corridor (Part 2)’ it becomes a more lush and head rocking beast as the use of frenetic keyboard jabbering’s take over from the vocals.

Leading into the ‘Decent’ are slamming drums and tambourines, overdubbed by backward and stabbing keyboards. Slowly we move forward into another place, with the sudden dropping off of the track we fall into disjointed wahwahs and glitching sounds, we are pushed into the ‘No Place To Go’ which is more reminiscent of the mid-eighties revivalist sounds of bands like Loop and Spacemen3. It sears across the room towards me. It is a real animal of a track, it grits and grimes around my head and is an instant classic to my ears.

It’s here we are turned onto the ‘From Tomorrow’ which is a true return to that eighties indie sound, such as the Pale Saints or Chapterhouse. It is here that I am beginning to be stunned by how much I like this album; it is familiar yet new at the same time. The guitars jangle down my spine and right through my rib cage. Leading straight into ‘All You Want To Be’, a pounding near post punk sounding classic, yes that’s right, a classic track. If I never hear any sound again I would be happy with the memory of this one, it verges on pop song status with its chant like chorus and moves me with some great hooks and a catchy beat.

‘Dreams Burn Down’ is a more subtle place again, sounding like a track from My Bloody Valentine’s ‘Loveless’. It weaves with lush ethereal guitars and vocals merging straight into ‘Chrome Cats’ yet another standout song on this slowly becoming my favourite album of this year. It still has that indie sound with a slight disjoint unconnected feeling as it reverberates around my living room. I can see this being played in clubs up and down the land. As it drops away we come back to what The Oscillationdo so well with the final track ‘Out Of Touch’ an outstanding song, it’s a unique moment for me, I’m transported to that rare, short lived world of my youth. It is in that place where I remember what it was like to hear something for the first time and being totally excited by it.

(Guy Nolan)

Let it not be said that The Oscillation do little to live up to their name. The first thing that hits the ears is a wavering and undulating chord that snakes its way out of the speakers with all the hypnotic grace of smoke curling and snaking away from a smouldering hookah pipe. It’s a nice touch and one of many that sets The Oscillation apart from many of the bands that are now breaking through on the back of psychedelic wave that’s threatening to turn into a mind-melting tsunami.

As evidenced by opener tracks ‘Corrider (Part 1)’ and ‘Corrider (Part 2)’, The Oscillation is a band that seduces with a false sense of security. Dampened chords and strict metronomic rhythms soon give way to cosmic explorations but what gives The Oscillation a true sense of identity is the way they manage to subvert and twist psychedelia into something that’s wholly their own. While most explorers of time and space anchor their excursions to standard song structures before blasting off into unexplored territories, The Oscillation are already out there. Not for them the launch pad of conventionality, The Oscillation grab the listener by the lapels and plunge them straight into a miasma of sonic misbehaviour.

What also counts in The Oscillation’s favour is how much to the fore the rhythm section of bassist Tom Relleen and drummer Valentina Magaletti is. Their roles aren’t confined to showing off to the guitar and pedal talents of Demian Castellanos by remaining in the background. Instead, their solid work is fused with the unholy and demented noises coaxed by the guitarist. The Middle Eastern inflections of ‘Descent’ wouldn’t be anywhere near as strong would it not be for treated drums that pan across the sound spectrum and a bass that positively throbs, probably no more so than on ‘No Place To Go’.

Castellanos’ vocals are smeared in reverb throughout and the effect isn’t unlike being privvy some kind of ritualistic ceremony. Indeed, closing epic ‘Out Of Touch’ would probably make the perfect musical accompaniment for your next S&M session alongside burning candles, a variety of painful looking toys and boots of shiny, shiny leather.